One thing that I detest during fall and winter is DRY SKIN! Every year I try my hardest to avoid dry skin because it causes my makeup to separate and look crackly. I’ve always used a sunscreen to moisturize my face before applying my makeup but this autumn I think I found my holy grail when it’s comes to makeup separation. I finally invested the time to find a hydrating primer and CoverFX has answered my prayers. After I apply my  sunscreen, I apply my Calming Primer.  I like this primer because it’s great for sensitive skin. If you’re like me, I suffer from hives and mild eczema. My sensitive skin is one of the main reasons why my makeup separates and this primer gets rid of my redness while calming my skin.

Lastly, when I finish my entire makeup routine, I love to spray the CoverFX Mattifying Setting Spray. I used to think setting sprays were a hoax but after a trial, I realized they actually get the job done. It keeps my makeup matte and together. I love a matte look because I don’t like looking shiny. In the summer, it’s cool to have a little shine to enhance your glow but in the winter I prefer my makeup to be all the way matte. If you guys and gals have any other winter makeup routines that you do, don’t be afraid to comment on this post.

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Makeup by: Eduard Emanuel 

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Being in Marrakesh, Morocco, at the amazing boutique hotel, Jnane Tamsna, was an incredible experience. It was full of great food, great people, great culture and a whole lot of dry heat. It was so hot, that 110 degrees was normal. Don’t get me wrong, I loveeee the heat, but that was heat that could fry some bacon. That being said, when it’s too hot outside, I tend to wear my hair in a style that is pushed away from my face. In high heat, gel tends to feel like it is melting on my scalp. Pomade gives my hair a good hold that feels light and I always want my edges to be laidddddd, so I started to use the Form Beauty, Polish Pomade.

 

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The polish pomade is lightweight and  “uses a blend of oils to lock in moisture, fight frizz and provide a smooth look and soft feel” (www.formbeauty.com). I was able to create the hairstyle, in the pictures above, in four simple steps.

  1. Since I was going for a sleek but bushy look. I first brushed out all of my curls.
  2.  I made a part in the center of my head but I only parted it half way.
  3.  I then damped the front part of my hair so my edges and the front could be slicked down and the back could big and bushy.
  4. Lastly, I brushed down the front area down and pinned it tight. I made the back part of my hair bigger and bushier for as 70’s style inspired look.

Inspiration

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Outfit Details:

screen-shot-2016-09-22-at-7-03-53-pmSomedays Lovin Daze Blue High-Rise Flare Leg
Vegas Nay Grand Glamor Lashes

My entire life, I have tried my hardest to keep my hair healthy and full of volume. As a young girl, my mother kept my hair in cornrows, twists, bantu knots/china bumps, or individual box braids.Growing up with an older brother who rocked Iverson cornrows, I had to follow his lead and be swagged out just like him. My mother put my hair in cornrows and braids so it was protected and well maintained during my childhood adventures, activities, and sports.  Myself , along with many other Black girls and other women of color, grew up wearing CORN ROWS or BOX BRAIDS to maintain healthy hair.Whoever wrote the article about KIM KARDASHIAN’S “BOXER BRAIDS”, should probably do some more research on ethic hairstyles. I’m not sure who created the term “BOXER BRAIDS”, nor where it developed from, but THAT IS NOT THE CORRECT TERMANOLOGY AT ALL!

When I first heard the incorrect term of cornrows, I was upset because I believe my cornrows hold cultural value and expression. For decades, media and high fashion have appropriated Black culture and have used a numerous amount of  styles and renamed them to fit “the norm”. Well, if you ask me, french braids and cornrows are my norm. I don’t care who wears the style, but it is important to me that they are referred to as CORNROWS and NOT BOXER BRAIDS!

3 REASONS WHY MY CORNROWS ARE NOT “BOXER BRAIDS”

  • Braids DO NOT stem from Boxers. Many female boxers wear cornrows as a protective while in the ring, but boxing or boxers did not develop the cornrow hair style. Cornrows were developed by Africans and depending on how the braids were styled you could identify someones age, status, religion, occupation and tribe.
  • Braids/Cornrows are a protective style for many black girls/girls of color. A protective style means that a person’s natural hair ends are tucked away and are kept that way to lock in moisture. Protective styles help with hair growth and avoids yanking and pulling hair on a daily basis.
  • Braids make me who I am today. All through elementary school and middle school, I wore braids because they looked cool and at the same time it helped me maintain healthy hair. My braids helped me develop confidence and made me feel like I could conquer the world. “Boxer Braids” might just be for the runway, but cornrows were created for everyday and the runway. When I wear my cornrows, I don’t just look good, I FEEL GOOD!

Love and Hugs,

Ivy Coco

Photographed by Anna May

Hair Braided by Shawnah at Hairstory Philly

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I remember being a kid and really wanting two things, braces and freckles. I got braces and I enjoyed them, until they started hurting me and was unable to eat my favorite candies. One think I never got were freckles. Some people think they look like mini black heads but I think they are absolutely gorgeous and they should be embraced. We all have a specific feature that makes us unique. Some have full lips, a fascinating bone structure, a gorgeous large forehead, or like me, thick eyebrows. I have seen so many makeup artists and high fashion magazines add faux freckles on models and clients. At first, I thought it was very strange until I tried it and I thought it was pretty funky. Working with with creator, designer, and professional makeup artist , Vyana Brie, she and a few other MUA’s taught me cool little tricks on how to create natural faux freckles.

Easy products to create faux freckles:

  1. MAC Eyebrow Pencil  mac_sku_M1EF03_640x600_0.jpg
  2. Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow Wiz  s1056084-main-hero.jpg
  3. Anastasia Beverly Hills Dipbrow Pomade  (apply with a fine paint brush that be bought at your local art store)s1578699-main-hero.jpg

 

 

Lightly apply the eyebrow pencil or pomade on the areas of your face where you want to create your faux freckles. Do not press the pencil or brush deeply into your skin because they will look like random dark marks on your face. Once you have applied them on the area of your face, use a beauty blender that already has a little leftover foundation on it above the faux freckles, so it looks natural on the skin. Lastly, lightly apply some foundation powder on top of your new faux freckles to hold them in place.

Have fun with your  face and stay cute!

xoxo,

Ivy Coco

Photographer: Art Crooks

MUA and Designer: Vyana Brie

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M.U.A. : Arnell Armon

Hair Stylist: Julius Nash

Photographer: Photos by Darrin

We all have different types of facial expressions that express a sense of emotion. I remember going through my teenage years and my mother told me that I had a “stank face”. I really didn’t understand what she meant, until she said my facial expression looks like I just smelled poop. I ignored her every time she reminded me I had this “stank face” on, but then I was talking to this cute guy and he said “don’t make that face, it looks like you just smelled $h*t.” In that moment, I was so mad because I couldn’t believe my mother was right and I was mad at myself for not listening to her. Like mothers always say ” you just had to learn the hard way.”

I know that I am the type of individual that wears my heart on my sleeve. Sometimes it’s so hard for me to not show my emotions, but after a few life lessons, I’v learned that I have control over my emotions. We don’t have control over how others feel, but we definitely have control over ourselves. We as individuals have the power to control how we feel. I remind myself everyday that happiness is a way of life and not a destination. I choose not to surround myself with negative energy because the best thing unhappy people are good at is making other people unhappy. It takes so much energy to be upset over something you have no control over. In situations when we are mad, we are so quick to REACT instead of RESPOND. When we are upset or when someone throws us a low blow, we can’t just react with more negativity, because it won’t solve anything. Sometimes we have to kill them with kindness. I know if someone chooses to have a negative attitude towards me or around me, I have the power to use my positivity to throw them off. If you know you can’t use your positive force, just walk away from it all. Nothing is worth making you come out of your character, because that one moment where you do choose to get out of character, can have a long term affect on how people view you and most importantly how you view yourself.

At the end of the day, we are all humans. We get sad, annoyed, angry, vexed, worried but those shouldn’t be emotions that you feel often. We should express and feel emotions of excitement, laughter, joy, happiness, and bliss throughout our daily life. We aren’t always jolly 24/7, but the most important thing is to have happiness as our core. I try to smile as much as possible because it makes me feel good about myself and smiling contagious. In the words of the late and great Bob Marley, ” Love the life you live and live the life you love.”

Peace and Love,

Ivy Coco